thoughts from C.Yung

“No amount of skepticism and criticism has yet enabled me to regard dreams as negligible occurrences.  Often enough they appear senseless, but it is obviously we who lack the sense and ingenuity to read the enigmatic message from the nocturnal realm of the psyche.  Seeing that at least half our psychic existence is passed in that realm, and that consciousness acts upon our nightly life just as much as the unconscious overshadows our daily life, it would seem all the more incumbent on medical psychology to sharpen its senses by a systematic study of dreams.  Nobody doubts the importance of conscious experience; why then should we doubt the significance of unconscious happenings?  They also are part of our life, and sometimes more truly a part of it for weal or woe than any happenings of the day.”

C.G. Jung. (1934)  “The Practical Use of Dream Analysis,”

The Practice of Psychotherapy, CW Vol. 16, par, 325.

“The dream is often occupied with apparently very silly details, thus producing an impression of absurdity, or else it is on the surface so unintelligible as to leave us thoroughly bewildered.  Hence we always have to overcome a certain resistance before we can seriously set about disentangling the intricate web through patient work.  But when at last we penetrate to its real meaning, we find ourselves deep in the dreamer’s secrets and discover with astonishment that an apparently quite senseless dream is in the highest degree significant, and that in reality it speaks only of important and serious matters.  This discovery compels rather more respect for the so-called superstition that dreams have a meaning, to which the rationalistic temper of our age has hitherto given short shrift.”

C.G. Jung.  “On the Psychology of the Unconscious.”

Two Essays on Analytical Psychology.  CW 7, par. 24.

At this time in the ashram, I was resting up after the long travelling and living under meager conditions in the cave etc. and I slowly began to realize how it had affected my body. We are not always aware how living in a North American country, most of our food is so sanitized,

so anti-septic, that our system reacts when suddenly exposed to many different kinds of bacteria. Sometimes we may even feel that we had some sort of neurosis.
I began reading from Carl Yung in the library and here are some very interesting words.

“We should not try to ‘get rid’ of a neurosis, but rather to experience what it means, what it has to teach, what its purpose is.

We should even learn to be thankful for it, otherwise we pass it by and miss the opportunity of getting to know ourselves as we really are.

A neurosis is truly removed only when it has removed the false attitude of the ego. We do not cure it – it cures us.

A person is ill, but the illness is nature’s attempt to heal the person. From the illness itself we can learn so much for our recovery, and what the neurotic flings away as absolutely worthless contains the true gold we should never have found elsewhere.”

C. G. Jung. “The State of Psychotherapy Today.” (1934)  Civilization in Transition. CW, Vol. 10, P. 170.

Now heres another dream,  on Tuesday August 8 in my hut in Shantivanam.
Last night the wind was very strong and sleep was light. I awoke to discover that some creatures were in my hut. On putting on the flash-light, I discovered two little cats. They came in to search for roaches and mice and rats.
Feeling some relief, I lay back and fell asleep soon after wards because I don’t like the idea of having neither roaches nor mice and rats running around.
I began to dream that it was morning and I was explaining to Sr. Louise about the cats in my hut and there were two women present who began to laugh out loud.
They explained to me that they were the cats who came into my hut.  I awoke!
71K, 500 x 650. 18 x 24″, acrylic, by Chris Wayan, 1999.
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2 thoughts on “thoughts from C.Yung

  1. I had a bad cold recently, I was praying to heal fast, I read a quote somewhere that said : ‘ don’t pray to heal the body, pray to understand the perspective of the body.’ It took me almost 3 weeks to heal from my cold. I kept in mind that the cold was just a message from my body, and that I needed to decode that message. I agree that what really heals us is to experience things thoroughly (the cold, the neurosis etc…) and looking into the deeper meaning. I have always found a deeper meaning. I find that body is always speaking to us, through disease and through dreams also.

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